Using Emojis And Emoticons At Work: Thumbs Up Or Thumbs Down?

Survey: Managers and Workers Have Mixed Emotions About Emojis and Emoticons

MENLO PARK, Calif., July 6, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Should workers hit "send" on that smiley face? As with most things, moderation is key, new research from staffing firm OfficeTeam suggests. Nearly four in 10 (39 percent) senior managers interviewed said it's unprofessional to include emojis or emoticons in work communications, but 61 percent stated it's OK, at least in certain situations. When office workers were asked how they feel about these symbols, 59 percent said they never or only sparingly use them, while 41 percent send them at least sometimes. 

Nearly 4 in 10 (39%) senior managers said it's unprofessional to include emojis or emoticons in work communications, but 61% stated it's OK, at least in certain situations. 59% of office workers said they never or only sparingly use them, while 41% send them at least sometimes.

View an infographic of the survey findings.

Senior managers were asked, "Which one of the following statements most closely describes how you feel when someone uses emojis or emoticons in work communications?" Their responses:

 

Smiley face -- it's fun!

21%

OK hand sign -- it's fine in certain situations

40%

Thumbs down -- how unprofessional!

39%


100%

 

Workers were asked, "Which of the following statements most closely describes how you feel about using emojis or emoticons in work communications?" Their responses:

 

I use them all the time because they help me show the feelings behind the message

19%

I use them sometimes but limit usage to casual exchanges with coworkers and not formal communications with higher-ups

22%

I use them sparingly since I don't think they appear very professional

26%

I never use them and prefer to express myself in writing

33%


100%

 

"Emojis and emoticons are showing up just about everywhere, but that doesn't mean they're always appropriate for the workplace," said Brandi Britton, a district president for OfficeTeam. "While using these symbols can help employees convey their feelings and personalities in written communications, they can also be distracting and appear unprofessional."

OfficeTeam offers workers five tips for using emojis and emoticons:

  1. Limit it. Use emojis and emoticons minimally, if at all. Going overboard with these icons could annoy others and muddle your message.
  2. Consider your audience. Be mindful of the corporate culture and your relationship with those you're communicating to. Sending an occasional smiley face to a work friend may be OK, but is less so when interacting with your boss or company leaders.      
  3. Evaluate the situation. Including these images can add levity, but it depends on the topic. Leave them out when discussing serious matters, as it can appear awkward or rude.       
  4. Stick to what you know. Don't use an emoji or emoticon if you aren't absolutely certain what it represents and how it will be received. Some symbols can be taken the wrong way or have multiple meanings.  
  5. Just say it. When in doubt, rely on words to get your point across. Opt for in-person or phone discussions with colleagues if it's helpful to see facial expressions or hear vocal inflections.

About the Research
The surveys of senior managers and workers were developed by OfficeTeam. They were conducted by independent research firms and include responses from more than 300 senior managers at U.S. companies with 20 or more employees, and more than 350 U.S. workers 18 years or older and employed in office environments.

About OfficeTeam
OfficeTeam, a Robert Half company, is the nation's leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled office and administrative support professionals. The company has more than 300 locations worldwide. For additional information, visit roberthalf.com/officeteam. Follow the OfficeTeam Take Note® blog at roberthalf.com/officeteam/blog for career and management advice.

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160705/386245-INFO

 

SOURCE OfficeTeam

For further information: Cynthia Kong, (650) 234-6298, cynthia.kong@officeteam.com


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