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'EITHER THE CARPET GOES, OR I GO!'

OfficeTeam Survey: Unusual Reasons Employees Give for Quitting Jobs

MENLO PARK, Calif., May 10, 2012 -- A stronger economy often gives workers greater courage to change jobs, but the excuses offered for jumping ship can leave many employers perplexed. A new OfficeTeam survey reveals the wackiest reasons job seekers have given for handing in their notice. Here are some examples:

  • "Someone left because her boss lost the dog she had given him."
  • "Our employee said he was joining the circus." 
  • "One person left because she lost her cell phone too many times at work."
  • "We had someone quit to participate in a reality show."
  • "An employee said it was his routine to change jobs every six months."

The survey was developed by OfficeTeam, a leading staffing service specializing in the placement of highly skilled administrative professionals. It was conducted by an independent research firm and is based on telephone interviews with more than 1,300 senior managers at companies with 20 or more employees in the United States and Canada. 

Some individuals simply had to follow their true calling: 

  • "One worker left to become an apple farmer."
  • "A staff member quit to climb Mount Everest."
  • "There was an individual who left to play the trombone."
  • "An employee wanted to enter a beauty contest."
  • "One worker quit to join a rock band."

It may be hard to fault these professionals for their honesty:

  • "A guy said he was making too much money and didn't feel he was worth it."
  • "One person left because she didn't want to work so hard."
  • "An individual said he was bored."
  • "Someone quit because she was going to live off her trust fund."
  • "An employee said work was getting in the way of having fun."
  • "A person quit because informal dress was not allowed."
  • "The worker told us he just couldn't get up in the morning."

And there were other employees who suffered from sensory overload: 

  • "He quit because he didn't like the way the office smelled."
  • "One employee didn't enjoy the cafeteria food."
  • "An individual did not like the sound of file cabinets being slammed."

These shortsighted workers gave notice when a day off might have sufficed:  

  • "One person quit to watch a soccer tournament."
  • "We had someone leave because he had to stay home to feed his dog."
  • "An employee left because he wanted to watch a movie with his girlfriend during work hours."

Some individuals couldn't ignore their eye for interior design:

  • "A person quit because he hated the carpet."
  • "One worker did not like the colors of the walls."
  • "The employee quit because the office building was unattractive."
  • "Someone felt the lobby area was too small."
  • "She hated the lighting in the building."

Then there was the worker who gave his employer the silent treatment:

  • "He just walked out without a peep. We have no idea why he left, and we were not able to contact him."

"How you leave a job can be just as important as what you did while you were there," said Robert Hosking, executive director of OfficeTeam. "Regardless of the reason for resigning, making a graceful exit by tying up loose ends and thanking colleagues shows your professionalism and can help you down the road in your career."

OfficeTeam offers five tips for leaving a job on good terms:

  1. Give proper notice. Tell your boss about your departure first so he or she doesn't hear it through the grapevine. Providing two weeks notice is standard, but if your schedule is flexible, offer to stay longer to train a replacement.
  2. Get things in order. Supply written instructions to team members on projects and make sure they have access to the tools and information needed to complete assignments.
  3. Stay positive. Take the time to say goodbye and thank you to colleagues. Provide your contact information and reach out to those with whom you'd like to keep in touch.  
  4. Don't slack off. Use your last weeks on the job to complete as much work as possible on outstanding projects. You want to be remembered as a strong contributor to the end.   
  5. Talk before you walk. Participate in an exit interview if it's offered. Be honest with your feedback, but keep it constructive and professional. Your comments and suggestions could potentially help to improve the workplace.  

About OfficeTeam
OfficeTeam is the nation's leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled office and administrative support professionals. The company has 315 locations worldwide and offers online job search services at www.officeteam.com


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